What's it like to design a user interface for six billion people? A personal history of modeless text editing and cut/copy-paste.

Date

Wednesday, January 16, 2013 - 6:30pm - 8:15pm

Venue

Silicon Valley Innovation Center

Silicon Valley Innovation Center
3200 Coronado Drive
Santa Clara, CA 95054
Speaker: 
Larry Tesler

Event Details

Source code editors used by people like us benefit from domain-specific features like automatic indentation, syntax coloring, bracket matching, declaration shortcuts, regular expressions, syntax checking and previews. Such features are of little or no use in applications such as word processing, email and text messaging. And most people don't want to learn and remember a different text editing user interface for every application. The speaker will recount his personal involvement in the formulation of the text editing paradigm that became the standard for general-purpose work. 

Note: The speaker covered much the same material in a keynote at CHI2011, at the November 2011 BayCHI meeting, and in the July-August 2011 issue of Interactions magazine.

Speaker Bio

Larry Tesler has been making software friendlier since he conducted his first usability study at Stanford in 1962. At PARC, he co-invented modeless text editing and originated paned-window browsing. At Apple, where he served as VP and chief scientist, he led groups that contributed to products like Lisa, Mac, QuickTime, AppleScript, HyperCard, and Newton. He served as VP of Shopping Experience at Amazon.com and VP of UED at Yahoo!. In 2010, Tesler was elected to ACM's CHI Academy. In 2011, he received the SIGCHI Lifetime Practice Award. He is currently an independent consultant.

Event page provided by ACM